High Carbs Or Low Carbs? Why Not Both?

Let’s analyze a few popular ‘carb’ plans to see what’s available and then take an unusual approach by combining the good points of each and developing a plan somewhere in the middle.

Diet plans are a dime a dozen. They’re everywhere and they come in many varieties. Each one claims to be the diet to end all diets and all others are pale in comparison. There’s low-fat, high-carb, low-carb, high-fat, and high- and low-protein. It seems one expert always disagrees with another expert’s diet plan because “their plan” is the only true plan that “really works.”

In this article we’ll analyze a few popular plans to see what’s available and then take an unusual approach by combining the good points of each and developing a plan somewhere in the middle.
Popular Diet Plans

It seems the biggest current craze is eating low carbs. Basically, you eat a lot of protein and any kind of fats, but you drastically limit your carbohydrate intake.

Combining Diet Plans

I was burning more calories than I was taking in. Ingesting too many carbs will make you fat – period. Now let’s take a look at how these two diets can be combined to come up with a healthy eating plan.

It’s easy to follow and it won’t make you feel like a zombie or make you crave bread and potatoes so bad that you can’t sleep at night. Are you interested? Good. Keep reading. This is where it gets fun.

This eating plan will combine key aspects of both low-carb diets and high-carb diets. Basically you’ll be rotating between low carbs on some days and high carbs on other days. It needs to be noted, however, that exercise must be incorporated to make this plan work most effectively. Ideally 20-30 minutes of cardio should be done four to five days per week and resistance training (weightlifting) should be performed three days per week.

The principles of this plan are very similar to what many athletes do to prepare for competitions. You’ve probably heard the term “carb loading.”

For extra energy, marathon runners try to eat lots of spaghetti and other carbs a day or so before the big race. This is a form of carb loading. Marathon runners, however, are not concerned about weight loss at this stage. They want maximum performance.

The following plan cycles carb intake for weight loss, not athletic performance. This is how it works. This example plan starts on Monday. (Diets always start on a Monday, right?) On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday you should take in about 50 grams or less of carbs. That would be equivalent to about 1-2 baked potatoes, or 2-3 small servings of rice for the entire day.

Eat about one gram of protein per pound of body  weight. A serving of meat, which is the size of a deck of cards, will have about 30 grams of protein in it. (Whole eggs have six grams of protein and the whites of eggs have three.)

Source: http://www.bodybuilding.com/

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